Upcoming Church Integration Circles

Oct 04

October – Integration Circle (In-Person)

October 4 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Oct 04

October – Integration Circle (Virtual)

October 4 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Nov 01

November – Integration Circle (In-Person)

November 1 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Nov 01

November – Integration Circle (Virtual)

November 1 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Dec 06

December – Integration Circle (In-Person)

December 6 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Dec 06

December – Integration Circle (Virtual)

December 6 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Join us for our monthly Integrations circles , these are a great way to continue your
process after a ceremony or just come out and ask some questions if you are new to Two Birds . Monthly integration circles are 100% free for our members, come join us every first Sunday of the month!


 Be kind to yourself, listen, and don’t be afraid to be authentic and share 

I want to be free, be me
Be the being that I see
Not to rise and not to fall
Being one and loving all
There’s no high
There’s no low
There is no place I should go
Just inside a little star
Telling me, be as you are.
Just inside a little star telling me – be as you are.

 


Great videos on preparing, integration, and general information


My Integration Plan


La Dieta


Integration is key

Insanity:
Doing the Same Thing Over and Over Again and Expecting Different Results

Following Dieta restrictions for 2 weeks after ceremony is recommended, and potentially beyond. What you take into your body and mind has a huge impact on your wellbeing, especially given the energetic sensitivity of your post-retreat state. You may make the choice to give up or limit certain items (processed food, pork, marijuana, alcohol, caffeine) and integrate this new habit into your life. Another important restriction is romantic and sexual activity following an ayahuasca ceremony. You will leave ceremony in a VERY open state, often feeling very loving. A lot of time, energy, and love is put into the ceremony from the facilitators and participants, so leaving the ceremony space can be hard if you did not take the time and space in ceremony to find that love within, and depend upon others to feed that feeling of completeness. A common problem after ceremony is trying to recreate those feelings and high energies from ceremony by seeking external sources such as drugs or sex. The longer you hide from dealing with those attachments and codependent behaviors, the harder the integration and real healing can be afterwards.

Ayahuasca is not a magic pill.  She will never do the work for you, so the hardest part of integration I have seen over the years for people is taking the first few steps after ceremony to actually make real changes in their life, and not just become a dog chasing its own tail ceremony to ceremony. Feeling the love, light and magic in ceremony is a big part of the healing and can give us the encouragement we need to face ourselves, but it is only the smallest part of the real healing that Ayahuasca can offer. Ideally this will be a personal experience for you to take the time and discipline in ceremony to sit with yourself, because inside is where all the answers are. Getting stuck on the high vibrations and being scared to face your shadows and ground into the real lessons is common, but will keep you from reaching your full potential.

Create a sane life. Ayahuasca often begins by showing you the need to create a life that’s grounded, healthy, and supportive of your ongoing transformation. This isn’t always easy, given the distortions of modern culture, but it’s essential. Making such changes goes deeper than ‘resolutions’ or ‘turning over a new leaf.’ Willpower alone won’t do the trick. But the insight and energy stimulated by ceremony can support you to develop new habits and release the old. At a minimum, you’re looking at a clean diet, a harmonious home space, supportive relationships, and a schedule that allows time for your own self-reflection and inner work.

Make commitments to yourself. In the week following retreat, consider what needs to change in your life. Identify specific physical, mental, emotional and spiritual habits you want to cultivate—maybe one to three in each category. These can be things you’re giving up/releasing, or new patterns you’re creating. Write them down, and create a small ceremony for yourself—light a candle, speak your intention and commitments, ask for support. Then put the paper somewhere special where you can read it occasionally. If you lapse along the way, just come back to those commitments. Remember that this process isn’t about being perfect; it’s about growing into a new way of being.

Journal your process. Thoughtful writing works at different levels. Writing can help you metabolize your experience—often we don’t know exactly how we think or feel about something until the words emerge spontaneously from within. Journaling also helps capture moments and realizations that might otherwise be lost, and records your transformative process for times when you may feel discouraged or confused. Some people keep a journey log, with details of ceremonies, meaningful conversations and resonant experiences. Artwork and your nightly dreams can be further additions to your journal.

Do what makes you happy. Making music. Walking in the woods. Playing with the cat. Dancing, cooking, yoga, gardening—whatever connects you to your heart, do it regularly in the time following your retreat. That which connects you to your heart also connects you to the truth and brings you into the present moment. Honor and respect this important opening.

Spend time in Nature. Connection with the earth is grounding and healing, just what we need in times of transition. Find ways to cultivate this relationship in your home area. Walks or runs, communing with a lake or forest or mountain, lying on the earth, sitting with a tree, bird-watching, barefoot gardening—all can ground and connect you to Pachamama.

Be conscious of who you share your experience with, as well as when and how. Talking too much about your journeys, particularly with an unappreciative audience, can cheapen the whole experience. Trust your instincts regarding who to share with. Sometimes it’s enough to say, “I went on meditation retreat, and came back with some insights.” Soul friends and friends experienced with the medicine are valuable, if you have them. By all means share but do so mindfully and consciously.

Take your time with big announcements and big decisions. Give yourself at least a month of integration (probably more) before separating from existing homes, jobs or relationships or starting new ones. Such big evolutionary shifts deserve serious thought and planning. Let yourself come into full alignment before taking action and consider the long-term implications as well as the immediate present.

Give it form. Express your experience creatively: draw, paint, model or sculpt, dance or sing or play with the energy that’s moving through you. Giving your feelings form allows them to ripen, grow, and integrate into your being.

Get bodywork. Intentional touch is highly integrative. A skilled and intuitive bodyworker (not just a masseuse) knows how to evoke and receive the experience of the emotional body as well as the physical one. Rosen Method, Bowen Technique, Body Talk, Rolfing, Craniosacral Therapy—there are many different modalities. Make a relationship with a skilled bodyworker in your home area.

Anchor your experience. Set up a small altar in your home, honoring your time on retreat and the transformational process you are now in. It can be as simple as a candle, flower, stone, and/or a meaningful photo tucked away on a shelf. Your altar can also include a growing list of realizations and commitments to yourself. This seeds your transformative process, which you can feed by lighting the candle and sitting quietly for 15 minutes a day in meditation.

Practice meditation regularly. This is perhaps the single most important suggestion of this entire list: develop some kind of spiritual practice, be it meditation or a mind-body practice like qigong, yoga, or tai chi that’s carried out with meditative awareness. Regular awareness practice creates a resilient container for the emotional cooking process that continues post-retreat, and helps you stay connected to your own inner guidance. Even five or ten minutes a day, morning and evening, can have a beneficial effect.

Here is a simple grounding meditation you can use to get in touch with yourself and become more grounded in everyday life. Steps 3 and 4 can be done separately in two different meditation sessions, or combined together as described here. This meditation should take about 15-20 minutes. 

1. Beginning the meditation
  • Begin sitting in a chair with your back straight, your feet flat on the floor, and your hands resting on your lap. If you prefer, you can sit on the floor or on a cushion.
  • Keep your eyes open at first. Take several deep breaths, in through your nose and out through your mouth.
  • After three or four breaths, close your eyes.
2. Become aware of your body
  • Now become aware of your physical body and bring your attention to the sensations you are feeling.
  • First, become aware of the point of contact between your body and the chair, and then the contact between your feet and the floor.
  • Next, become aware of the contact between your hands and your thighs. If thoughts arise during this process, simply let them go by and return your focus to the meditation.
  • Next, become aware of any sounds you hear, then any smells, and any tastes in your mouth.
  • Try to experience each of these things one at a time, and then simply be with all of them and everything you are experiencing, all at the same time.
3. Bring the mind down into the body
  • Bring your attention to your physical brain. Picture your brain inside your body and inside your head – this represents the mind.
  • Now, imagine that your brain is slowly descending, moving down the back of your body and down your spine. Try to feel the physical feeling as if this was really happening, as well as picturing it in your mind. Feel as your brain sinks all the way down to the base of your spine, down into the core center of your body.
  • If thoughts arise during this process, again, just let them go by. What you are doing is simply imagining your brain (a physical representation of the mind) sinking from up in your head down deep into your body – really into your lower spine and pelvic floor. (If you are familiar with yoga/chakras, this is the root chakra.)
  • Repeat this as many times as you like, and when you feel ready move on to step 4.
4. Grounding with roots
  • As you continue to sit, picture your own body in your mind with the ground beneath you. You can picture yourself sitting as you are, or standing up – it doesn’t matter, as long as the ground is beneath you in in the picture in your mind.
  • Now, visualize as roots begin to grow from the bottoms of your feet and down into the earth. Imagine as they dig down one, two, then three times the length of your body, deep down into the earth. These roots are holding you fast to the ground and not letting you float away.
  • Now imagine a third root, this time coming from the base of your spine, that digs down into the earth in the same way. This root travels one, two, then three body lengths deep. These roots are connecting you to the earth and to nature. They are pulling you downwards, out of the clouds and out of your head, and down into your body and the earth beneath you.
  • Again, try to feel the physical sensation as if this were really happening. You can repeat this visualization as many times as you like. In the same way, feel free to stay with the image, and with the feeling, for as long as you like.
5. Finishing up
  • Once you have done the grounding portions of the meditation, return your attention to the physical sensations in your body. Notice any sounds, any smells or tastes, the same as at the beginning. Just become aware of everything you are experiencing and be with it for a few moments.
  • Then slowly tilt your head so you are looking down at the ground, and slowly open your eyes. Sit for a moment and simply take notice of how you feel, and then get up and continue on with your day.

 

1. Beginning the meditationBegin sitting in a chair with your back straight, your feet flat on the floor, and your hands resting on your lap. If you prefer, you can sit on the floor or on a cushion.

Keep your eyes open at first. Take several deep breaths, in through your nose and out through your mouth.

After three or four breaths, close your eyes.
2. Become aware of your bodyNow become aware of your physical body and bring your attention to the sensations you are feeling.

First, become aware of the point of contact between your body and the chair, and then the contact between your feet and the floor.

Next, become aware of the contact between your hands and your thighs. If thoughts arise during this process, simply let them go by and return your focus to the meditation.

Next, become aware of any sounds you hear, then any smells, and any tastes in your mouth.

Try to experience each of these things one at a time, and then simply be with all of them and everything you are experiencing, all at the same time.